Tuesday, 12 December 2017

Bali on high volcanic alert





Bali on high volcanic alert

November 27, 2017
Fears of an imminent major eruption of Bali’s Mount Agung have increased and many people around the volcano have been evacuated.
Indonesian authorities have raised the state of alert to its highest level.
The island’s airport has now closed, leaving thousands stranded in the tourist hotspot.
Authorities say dark smoke and ash have been billowing up to 3,400m above the mountain’s summit, which has also been emitting fire.
Officials have warned residents to stay away from rock and debris flows known as lahars, which have been spotted flowing down from the mountain.
The volcano was seen emitting “continuous ash puffs” occasionally accompanied by “explosive eruptions” and “weak booms” that could be heard 12km (7 miles) from the summit.
“The rays of fire are increasingly observed at night. This indicates the potential for a larger eruption is imminent,” the National Board for Disaster Management said in a statement.

1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? Things on an imminent major eruption of Bali’s Mount Agung have increased and many people around the volcano have been evacuated.    

2. What was the key event from the news article? Indonesian authorities have raised the state alert to its highest level.

3. Where did this event take place? Authorities say that dark smoke and ash have been billowing up 3,400m above the mountain summit which has been emitting fire.

4. When did this event take place? The island’s airport has now closed leaving thousands stranded in the tourist hotspot.

Thursday, 7 December 2017

SPEC Prizegiving 2016





On Tuesday we went to base school at Tamaki for SPEC prizegiving and we sat down to watch the other students get their SPEC certificates from different classes. Then it's Edgewater 3's turn and Diane Bradley has got his cup for his work experience and she gave the students their SPEC certificates for their hard work. We helped my class to bring the SPEC books upstairs and put them in the book room. Then we went down the stairs and we went back on the van to go back to school for lunch.

Coral transplants could help Great Barrier Reef



Coral transplants could help Great Barrier Reef

November 27, 2017
Scientists are regrowing coral from larvae on damaged patches of the Great Barrier Reef in a project that could change the management of reef systems worldwide.
Professor Peter Harrison from Southern Cross University has been collecting coral spawn off Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef and maturing it in tanks.
“It’s really exciting, this essentially is the rebirth of the reef,” Professor Harrison said.
A team of scientists has deposited millions of coral larvae back onto damaged areas that may not regenerate naturally.
They created large enclosures around the coral using mesh curtains and special tiles to monitor growth.
Days later, photographs reveal coral polyps had survived, and were settling into their new home.
It is the first time this technique has been used in Australia, and it follows a successful trial in the Philippines that transformed reefs devastated by blast fishing.
“I think that this could be something that changes management of reefs worldwide. All of the reefs, everywhere in the world, are suffering at the moment,” Dr David Wackenfeld, Chief scientist at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority said.
“In the past, the Marine Park Authority has had a philosophy of basically getting out of nature’s way.
“But climate change is really changing that. The reef is battered and bruised. It’s more impacted than it’s ever been before.”
Dr Wackenfeld said it had never been more urgent to tackle climate change.


1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? Scientists are regrowing coral from larvae on damaged patches of the Great Barrier Reef in a project that could change the managements of reef systems worldwide.  


2. What was the key event from the news article? Professor Peter Harrison from Southern Cross University has been collecting coral spawn of Heron Island of the Great Barrier Reef and maturing it in tanks.


3. Where did this event take place? They created large enclosures around mesh corals using mesh curtains and special tiles for monitor growth.


4. When did this event take place? A team of scientists has deposited millions of coral larvae back onto damaged areas that may not regenerate naturally.

Wednesday, 6 December 2017

The Wonky Zebra

The Wonky Zebra By Finn



Jonny the zebra had only 3 legs and he is the wonky zebra. He tried to walk with 3 legs and it did not work well. He felt sad.





Then the truck came along and put the zebra inside the truck and took him to the zoo. He was very happy that he would be fixed.




When the truck arrived at the zoo. they took Jonny the zebra down to the fence. The zoo keeper put a new leg on Jonny the zebra.



Jonny will walk very well now his leg has been fixed. Jonny was very happy to have a new leg on. It was good as new.



The zookeeper left, he was very happy he fixed the zebra’s leg and Jonny went to join the other zebras to play together.












Thursday, 23 November 2017

Auckland to get fuel tax

Auckland to get fuel tax

November 1, 2017
A new petrol tax of 10-cents a litre for Aucklanders is only months away, with the council hoping to introduce the tax as soon as possible.
The newly sworn-in government has confirmed it will change legislation to pave the way for the Auckland Council to bring in the new levy.
The money raised from the new tax will be used to help pay for $15 billion worth of light rail around the city, as well as new bus ways, bike paths and roads.
Auckland Mayor Phil Goff said the fuel tax was the fairest way to raise the money needed to pay for new transport projects.
The new fuel tax will replace the current Interim Transport Levy, which expires in June next year.
Mr Goff said this 10-cent a litre tax raises twice as much money, and is a fairer way to source it.


1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? A new petrol tax of ten-cents of a litre for Aucklanders is only months away, with the council hoping to introduce the tax as soon as possible.


2. What was the key event from the news article? The newly sworn-in government has confirmed it will change legislation to pave the way for the Auckland Council to bring in the new levy.


3. Where did this event take place? The new fuel tax will replace the current interim Transport Levy, witch expires in June next year.


4. When did this event take place? The money raised from the new tax will be used to help pay for $15 billion worth of light rail around the city, as well as new bus ways, bike paths and roads.

Friday, 17 November 2017

Air New Zealand named airline of the year



Air New Zealand named airline of the year

November 6, 2017
Air New Zealand has been named Airline of the Year for 2018.
Airline website AirlineRatings.com has given the company the award for the fifth consecutive year.
The airlines were judged on 12 key criteria, including fleet age, passenger reviews, profitability, investment rating, product offerings and staff relations.
AirlineRatings.com said Air New Zealand was honoured for its “record-breaking performance, multi award-winning in-flight innovations, operational safety, environmental leadership and motivation of its staff”.
Other winners included Qantas (Best Domestic Airline Service, Best Catering and Best Lounges), Singapore Airlines (Best First Class and Best Cabin Crew) and Korean Air (Best Economy).
Best In-Flight Entertainment went to Emirates, while Tianjin took out the category of Most Improved Airline.
A new category – Best Low-Cost Airline – went to VietJetAir.
AirlineRatings.com’s Top 10 Airlines for 2018:
1. Air New Zealand
2. Qantas
3. Singapore Airlines
4. Virgin Australia
5. Virgin Atlantic
6. Etihad Airways
7. All Nippon Airways
8. Korean Air
9. Cathay Pacific
10. Japan Airlines


1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? Air New Zealand has been named airline of the year for 2018


2. What was the key event from the news article? Airline website AirlineRatings.com has given the company the award of the fifth consecutive year.


3. Where did this event take place? Other winners included Qantas (Best Domestic Airline Service, Best Catering and best lounges), Singapore Airlines (Best First Class and Best Cabin Crew) and Korean Air (Best Economy.


4. When did this event take place? The airlines were judged on 12 key Criteria including fleet age, passenger reviews, Profitability Investment rating, product offerings and staff relations.  

Thursday, 9 November 2017

New Zealand remembers Passchendaele




New Zealand remembers Passchendaele
October 16, 2017
October 12 marked the 100th anniversary of New Zealand’s darkest day on a battlefield: The Battle of Passchendaele.
Officially 843 New Zealanders died and over 1700 were wounded in just the first few hours of October 12th 1917, as allied troops tried and failed to take the village of Passchendaele in Belgium.
The battle eventually claimed the lives of nearly 2000 New Zealand soldiers.
Historian, Ian McGibbon said that while 843 New Zealanders were officially listed as killed in the first few hours of the offensive, his research into the wounded shows that another 114 men died over the next three months from wounds received on that morning.
Canadian troops eventually captured what was left of Passchendaele in early November, but six months later the Germans retook it and held it until just before the end of the war.
The New Zealand National Commemorative service was held in Belgium. Other services were held in New Zealand, including at the Pukeahu National War Memorial Park and the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? October 12 marked the 100th anniversary of New Zealand darkest day on a battlefield: the Battle of Passchendaele.

2. What was the key event from the news article? Officially 843 New Zealanders died and over 1700 were wounded in just a few hours of October 12 1917 as allied troops tried and failed to take the village Passchendaele in Belgium.

3. Where did this event take place? Canadian troops eventually captured what was left of Passchendaele in early November, but six months later the German retook it and held it until just before the end of the war.  

4. When did this event take place? The battle eventually claimed the lives of nearly 2000 New Zealand Soldiers.